Pecorino with broad beans

Pecorino with broad beans

Pecorino with broad beans

Fave con pecorino. This is not so much a recipe as a serving suggestion. People tend to forget that broad beans (known as fava beans in the US) can be eaten raw. So, for that matter, can peas. Also there is a bit of a misunderstanding about what exactly is pecorino. Any sheep’s milk cheese is a pecorino, from pecora, which means sheep in Italian. The only pecorino commonly available outside of Italy is Pecorino Romano and is usually used grated as a seasoning, in a similar way to parmesan. This recipe calls for a younger, less salty cheese. Of course, you can break with tradition and use a cow’s milk cheese.  When broad beans come into season, this is one of the most popular way to eat them. Some people serve them shelled and the cheese cut into little squares, but most people provide a pile of beans and a lump of cheese and let their guests get on with it. Eat each bean with a small piece of cheese. They are served as an antipasto or at the end of the meal, before the dessert.

Linguine with cuttlefish ragu

Linguine al ragu di seppia. Serves 6

Cuttlefish ragu ingredients

Cuttlefish ragu ingredients

  • 6 medium cuttlefish, cleaned, whole
  • 100g  onion,sliced
  • olive oil
  • parsley, chopped
  • 1kg chopped tomato (fresh or tinned)
  • 600g linguine
  • 100g pecorino pugliese, grated
  1. Fry the onions in plenty of olive oil for a few minutes. Add the cuttlefish and fry on all sides.
  2. Add the tomatoes and cook over a low heat for around 3/4 hour.
  3. When the cuttlefish are tender, remove from the sauce and keep warm.
  4. Season the sauce with salt and pepper. It probably wont need much salt as the cuttlefish can be quite salty.
  5. Dress the cooked pasta with the sauce. Serve sprinkled with the pecorino and parsley. Top each portion with one of the cuttlefish.

linguine with cuttlefish ragu finished dish

Note: If the cuttlefish are quite large, you may prefer to serve them as the second course.